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johnson readily be barry goldwater and richard nixon overwhelming george mcgovern. in each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public. and the winner had the advantage of the weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term, landslide, because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a heated battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country with the winner walking off with the modest majority. it is a customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president, or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term, versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger? it's easy to point to the national security, or the economic consequences, or consequent impact on the ratin
instead of wanting to be magic johnson, he wants -- >> now the moan is beginning mark. charles schumer of new york, the chairman of the joint committee on inaugural ceremony. >> mr. president, mr. vice president. members of congress, all who are present, and to all who are watching, welcome to the capital and to his celebration of our great democracy. [applause] [cheering] >> this is the 57th inauguration of an american president. and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, it's simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, it's meaning, that sacred yet cautious entrusting of power from we the people to our chosen leader, never fails to make one's heart beat faster as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! [cheering] >> now, we know that we would not be here today where it not for those who stand guard around the world to preserve our freedom. to those in our armed forces, we offer our infinite thanks. for your bravery, your honor, your sacrifice. >> this democracy of ours was forged by intellect argument, by activism and blood. and, above all,
captioning made possible by johnson & johnson, where quality products for the american family have been a tradition for generations good morning. i'm charles osgood, and this is sunday morning. by law today is inauguration day. the big public ceremony won't take place until tomorrow. a short while ago supreme court justice administered the office to vice president biden. president obama will take the oath a little later this morning. in good times and bad we expect the president to be leading the way for the rest of us. how well past presidents have done in that regard is a question that keeps historians busy. barry pederson will have our cover story. >> i franklin delano roosevelt... >> reporter: 43 men have held the office of president, but only a handful seem to stand out in history's rear view mirror. >> washington, lincoln. reporter: every historian has a list of favorites. >> they had courage. and they had integrity. >> reporter: the presidents who were our greatest leaders and why. later on sunday morning. >> osgood: a presidential limosine it is not but a brand new version
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
is the day that 40 years ago today, lyndon johnson died. i think he would have recognized and probably admired that speech yesterday very much. and i think one way of understanding it is to look at it as a reply to ronald reagan in 1981. in the same place ronald reagan got up and said government is not the solution to the problem, government is the problem. yesterday was sort of not only a response to that but almost a bookend as reagan moved the country in a conservative direction. barack obama obviously hopes to move it in a liberal direction. >> the "new york times" editorial had this to say. mr. obama is smart enough to know that what he wants to achieve in his second term must be done in the next two years, perhaps even the first 18 months. there is no doubt that mr. obama has the ambition and intellect to place himself in the first rank of presidents. with this speech, he has made a forceful argument for a progressive agenda that meets the nation's needs. we hope he has the political will and tactical instincts to carry it out. lot of things in that quote, but one that struck me,
johnson. that's what the former broncos gm says johnson told him during the interview for the gm job. they are expected to train or release tebow. an iconic sports stadium is in ruins. roof panels at the silverdome left shredded and at that timers after blowing winds. the roof was slated after the project. it used to be home of the detroit lions. the fed-ex field opened in 2011. >> the camel called the super bowl with the ravens. the general manager writes each team's name on a hand and covers his hands with graham crackers. the hand that princess has gone to first has won 6 out of the last 7 years. princess predicting the ravens will win. follow this one. see what happens. >> time now 20 minutes after the top of the hour. coming up three minutes extra at the dinner table enough to keep everybody healthy. >> this team right here. did you know this company little tykes considered spending the iconic cos szy coupe over sea te is. why this company decided to stay in the usa. i have the story coming up. : >> it is 43 after the hour. first israel prime minister benjamin netanyahu schedule
. >> reporter: lyndon johnson took the oath aboard air force one after the murder of president kennedy in dallas. johnson placed his hand on kennedy's catholic missile or prayer book perhaps mistaking it for a bible >> i do gerald r. ford to solemnly swear... >> reporter: and gerald ford was sworn in after richard nixon resigned in disgrace >> this is the village of plymouth notch >> reporter: of all these unforeseen inaugurals the most picturesque has to be calvin coolidge's >> this has been called one of the best preserved presidential sites in the country >> reporter: william oversees the coolidge historic site in the tiny village of plymouth notch vermont our 30th president's hometown. >> this is the coolidge homestead from calvin lived from the time he was four and where he happened to be vice president when word came that warren harding the president had died. it all happened at 2:47 in the morning >> reporter: it all looks pretty much the way it did back on that very historic very early morning in 1923. >> we're walking into the sitting room and this is now known as the oath of office roo
in the nation's capital with estimates ranging as high as 1.9 million people. until then, lyndon johnson held the record crowd of 1.2 million in 1965. attendance for president obama's second inauguration is projected to be lower than his first. president george w. bush's second inaugural in 2005 drew up to 500,000 people.>> it may be sot before we get the official estimate of the crowd here, certainly not 1.8 million who were here in 2009, but estimates before the inauguration ranged from 600,000 to 800,000 but what we can report to you is that there were a lot of americans in the national mall today who were overjoyed to witness history, inauguration of any president is a remarkable moment in american history. and they were there today, many of them with their children to see these events. the president was inaugurated of course under the -- in the shadow i probably should say, the capitol dome. a fascinating thing about the dome of the capitol, this year is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the capitol dome. something that was mentioned today during the president's inauguration. h
-- johnson says to bush what are you doing here? bush he said, we just want to pay our respects. johnson was advising bush for the next couple of years about whether or not to run for office. johnson's the one who when bush was going to run for the senate he said what's the difference between the house and the senate? he said what's the difference between chicken and chicken salad? can you imagine now a republican congressman from houston going to see off a democratic president out of respect? >> especially mika the inauguration of a newly elected president in your party when everybody is most excited to elbow their way to the front. for george h.w. bush that's a great example. another great example, william f. buckley. he had liberal friends. in fact, he campaigned for liberals that were his friends even though he knew it upset some on the conservative side. for william f. buckley, it wasn't a blood sport. >> to end this block, to counter it just a bit, and i'm sorry but it has the added value of being true, the president does need to reach out.agree. but he has, an
or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i think we saw the president saying, what he's wanted to say for 10 years. and republicans as a result, really back on their heels. republicans now may not get anything from this president in the next three clips. this is not a president who's getting ready to cave or to make a deal with them. starting tomorrow, they're going to try to get back on the offensive. tomorrow, they're going to introduce their bill, vote on their bil
, right? lyndon johnson is getting sworn in on air force one. roosevelt had to go to a house in buffalo. there's one where mckinley died and one where roosevelt was sworn in and he kind of stumbled through it all, yeah i got the oath. so he didn't have his hand on the bible. he said a few words, but he became president. it reminds us that things are sometimes haphazard at inaugurations. we don't get to pre plain like we do for this one. >> president obama's first inauguration drew record crowds. how do you think it will be remembered? >> i have kids who have the place mat and on it you have presidents on it. it's all white faces and now you have the first african-american. man, was that historic. you had people pouring in here electricity in the air. it didn't matter what the speech was that year. it was about the atmospherics. this time around i think the speech the president gives is going to be more important. they're having less balls, less crowds, more enthusiasm. he can make up for that by having words that may some day be carved in marble. >> douglas brinkley.
vice president andrew johnson's drunken inaugural address. this is about an hour.>> thank you very much. that is a hard act to follow. i will try my best. we are about to have an inauguration on monday. the first question that comes to people's minds often in inauguration as they are standing or sitting in the cold waiting on the ceremonies to begin is we have separation of powers in this country. how is it that the president of the united states is being sworn into office on the steps of the capitol t legislative branch of the government. how did this all come about? it's not in the constitution. if you read the constitution it's sparse. it tells you the date and time the president is to be sworn in and the exact words of the oath but it doesn't say anything else. but yet we have this long two centuries of tradition built up around presidential inaugurations. it comes down to which came first, the chicken or the egg. and the fact is in 1979 when this brand new government was getting started the first part of government to meet was the congress. it was supposed to meet on march 4 but co
tonight, britta. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ♪ let's go. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new cadillac xts... another big night on the town, eh? ...and the return of life lived large. ♪ see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. >>> there is no doubt that our country has been divided on many issues, and finding common ground has not been e
. >> patrick leahy, thank you for being with us. >> we continue conversation with fawn johnson and jennifer steinhauer. >> what is the moment you will remember? >> he expressed frustration about the gun hearings he's about to hold. it reflects the difficult position that he is in and the dynamic of the entire democratic caucus. there are a lot of members that come from red states or have a very moderate, pro-gun record. he is in a tough spot himself in terms of protecting and working with his members who are concerned about going too far or doing anything on guns. and also as regarding his role as chairman. he mentions decisions had to go through his committee. dianne feinstein is running an assault weapons bill. she's about to introduce it. other members are interested. he wants to be associated with and control this process but he has to work very carefully. >> you wrote about this about the devil will be the details. >> what is an assault weapon? how do you define it? this is not a surprise, the kinds of questions i am asking, will not be answered immediately. these are the things you ha
. johnson & johnson and verizon are a little bit weaker, but five-year highs. we'll see if the market can hold on to this. chris, back to you. >> thank you, becky. >>> next, a small state's big push for gun reform. delaware attorney general beau biden will be here next to talk about the lessons that his state is learning from the tragedy in newtown, connecticut. >>> plus, biding his time? new signs the vice president is making plans to be back on inaugural podium in four years, this time in a little bit different role. could the third time be the charm for joe biden? >>> but first, a look ahead at the president's schedule. as peter mentioned, he will be attending the national prayer service this morning and then the staff ball later this evening. you're watching "the daily rundown." it is only on msnbc. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. when i first felt the diabetic nerve pain, of co
sarah hughes who was summoned to duty aboard air force one with lyndon johnson following a national tragedy, for the fourth time in our nation's history a woman has sworn in either the president or the vice president of the united states. i had a chance to sit down with justice sotomayor this week to talk about her historic moment. >> i was thinking just a couple of days ago if i think back of when i was a kid, which of the two events would have seemed more improbable to me. i realized each one was so far fetched that i couldn't have imagined either. >> supreme court, swearing in the vice president? >> supreme court or swearing in the vice president in front of the nation and the world. >> does it make you anxious? >> anxiety is not the word. >> and you talked to her, soledad, about how she's perceived on the bench. >> yeah. and she's considered to be very tough and she doesn't really mind or care what people have -- have that analysis of how she is on the bench. here's what she told me. >> i think the noblest profession in the world is lawyering and if a lawyer showed up who wasn't
, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. officeyour business needs...k... at prices that keep you...out of the red. this week get a bonus $15 itunes gift card with any qualifying $75 ink purchase. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. >>> and good morning to washington, d.c. inauguration prep's underway as the national day of service event is unfolding. live pictures there was ava longoria speaking now at that national day of service. a whole lot of celebrities here in washington. certainly trying to do their part to support the president and, of course, the national day of service which has become a tradition here. hundreds of thousands of people starting
-line second amendment position and president obama's position. if you were johnson or bill clinton you would have private meetings or ask your chief staff or others to have private meetings with republican members and say, what can we do? what can we agree on? no. they have this task force that is entirely testimony of all the people on his side, the n.r.a. comes in for 20 minutes and he announced the gun control, he does 23 executive orders and has a list of legislation. there is not much evidence that he wants to or knows how to try to co-op the republicans. >>bret: the moody -- bloody end to the algerian hostage stand off. >>bret: the smoke is clearing in algeria as the national gas plant. they captureed five surviving militants but the death toll is rising. 23 hostages have been killed and reuters say the number is 48. the total number of militants and hostages could be 81 with a number western governments upset how this went down. we are back with our annal. the administration said today, a.b. saying we will lead where they can lead but in this situation the algerians took the lead and
released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washington. we met with the vice president biden in the white house, the entire house democratic leadership, senate majority caucus, and rising leaders such as senator marco rubio, and other key decision-makers, pushing for action to the fiscal cliff. during those meetings we made it known that cities have already led on deficit reduction. mayors know how to balance budgets. [applause] we do it every day. we do it every year. through this recession we made the tough decisions that washington has been unwilling to make. while we also maintained key investmen
. it was considered dangerous. curriculum deviation, i was fired. i was hired shortly after by the johnson administration. [laughter] my favorite worldwide poet happens to be the irish poet. william butler yeats. there are lines many of us learn in school and forget. he said, the best lack all conviction while the worst are full of passionate intensity. we need that passionate intensity on our side, on the side of the poor children in this earth. i beg the president to summon up the courage to give us that voice. if he does not, it would be a terrible betrayal of his role and he will miss an opportunity to leave behind a beautiful legacy in history. it will be his tragedy as well as ours. [applause] >> we are clearly headed to a real debate about austerity. i do not believe austerity is the answer. some people do. there is a big debate in the coming weeks as we get to this debt ceiling debate. talk to me, from your perspective, about this notion of compassionate conservatism. there was a movement 12 years ago to present that as an alternative. what happened to that? >> i would be glad to g
johnson, was in power. this president has made no secret of his ambition to be the fourth transformative president. and the question is, will he, in his speech today, show a kind of combative nature that led to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're goin
. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >>> it was a crime that gripped a nation 20 years ago, 9-year-old little girl named katie beers had been locked in a dungeon on long island and sexually abused by her kidnaper john esposito, seven days chained by the neck locked in a wooden box suspended by the ground. television provided the only distraction, her only light, her meals were junk food. ultimately her captors broke down and she was able to be rescued. beers revealed her story in a new book called "buries memories." nice to have you with us. >> thank you. >> this book is such a page turner in part because i remember the story so well, the little girl whose poster was everywhere, as a fellow long islander this was headline news. you ended up being kept in this dungeon, the pictures came out, it was just stunning. you were 10 years old when they rescued you. >> yes. >> did you think that you were
like the libertarian candidate gary johnson was advocating last year where if you buy something you just pay the tax on it, there is no more income tax or corporate tax but a consumption type flat tax. host: do you think that would work? caller: i think that would eliminate all these loopholes people take twn tax code system. if you're married, own a house, have children, you get all these deductions and if you don't have any of those things, then you don't get to take any of those deductions so it's just not fair. if your income comes from capital gains there is a different tax rate for you. if the government wants to help bring the economy back, make everything fair across the board as far as taxes go. host: thanks for the call. we welcome our listeners and our focus this morning the role of government in solving america's problems. it was something that dwight eisenhower talked about in his fair well address 52 years ago this week. from our twitter page there is this from one of our viewers -- rick is joining us from maryland democrats line. good morning. caller: good morning. i
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
government. peter johnson him up box these legal -- legal analyst. good to have you with this. that is precisely what the president is talking about doing >> with like this notion of having doctors ask people of whether they have guns in their home. what is the next step? was this part of obamacare to begin with? was as part of the plan by which the government becomes literally big brother peering into the hall saying, okay, tell me about yourself road and also tell me whether their is a beretta in your house. if you tell me that that i may have the obligation to report it to the federal government or face an economic or other disciplinary sanction. that is outrageous, and that is scary. lou: as you heard the attorney generals say, he had expected the president to go farther than he did today with his executive initiatives, whether they be memoranda or executive orders. tell what you? >> he has some understanding of the constitution, but the spirit of the executive orders is in derogation of the second amendment. let me do what i can to keep score and end humiliation and been
that johnson was asking for all those big things together really helped. >> the end of the iraq war was not marked as a massive occasion in this country when it happened. there was some primetime news programs that didn't cover it the day that it happened, the day that was the end of the war. but people, when you ask them broadly in the country, end up ranking ending the war as president obama's greatest single accomplishment in his first four years. what explains the primacy of that in memory, even as it was buried in the news as we went through it? >> well, go back to the democratic primaries of 2008. what was the biggest issue? barack obama probably became the nominee largely because he was against the war at the beginning. hillary clinton was for it. so people obviously noticed the absence of that. but even more than that, i'm sure you're wiser than i was. but four years ago i could not imagine that anyone who was president could not only have gotten us completely out of this war, but also do so without that government in iraq collapsing, and more so, without an angry domestic b
of the issues of the day. today, the 40th anniversary of the death of president johnson lbj fought for the passage of the voting rights act in 1965. this is what he had to say the day he signed the act into law. >> today is a sound of freedom as huge as any victory that's ever been won on any battlefield. >> michael: and even as he spoke then, you know, that long ago the supreme court has agreed to hear a constitutional challenge to the act this year. president obama's inaugural address yesterday, though, he recognizes the battle for voting rights isn't over. here's the president. >> obama: our journey is not complete a citizen is not forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. >> michael: now that he has been inaugurated, do you think voters going to the ballot is at risk. >> i think it is. the republicans are a minority party. they got the minority in the presidential and senate and over all house races they're not working with the demographic roots that are growing in this country, which are largely latinos. and it will make it impossible for them to break into that
in and attacked that. now, in my opinion that wasn't partisan. it was his vision of america. as lyndon johnson had a vision of the great society. it wasn't anti-republican. it was his vision. john kennedy, the new frontier. i think the president from the way i was taking it was saying i think b this is the vision america needs to go in. but it wasn't for just four years. he said we're not talking four months, four years, or 400 years. >> that's exactly right. and you played the clip talking about how the social safety net allows us to take risks and not fear the failure. other countries don't have that. i spent a lot of time in india where there was such a fear of taking on new initiatives and being entrepreneurial because there wasn't that same safety net in place. that is the progressive vision. let's be real. paul ryan, here's a guy who supports privatizing social security, voucherizing medicare. so the president is not putting up a strawman argument. these are exactly the principles that republicans support. and also republicans have never been comfortable with social security and medicare. th
. johnson middle school will continue to operate because of safety reasons. officials cite possible fights and crews in the neighborhood. the chancellor says they'd save $8.5 million overall in savings from programming in the first year, but it doesn't add up for some in the community. >> to be shutting schools down and closing schools down it's a big concern because the thing of it is kids can't go to school in their neighborhood and have to travel across the town to go to school, it's not right. >> reporter: so some good news with the bad, 13 of those 15 schools will close at the end of this school year. you can find a full list on our website www.wusa9.com. for now we're live in northeast, ko im, 9 news. >> that's thanks -- thanks for the update. >>> you probably notice our screen looks a bit different today. we made those changes in response to you. you told us you want a simple clean and clear look and we responded. first we reduced all this clutter. all the information now is organized at the bottom of your screen. the big line is called the information bar and it's designed to giv
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that continues to play the race card. hank johnson says the n.r.a. opposes barack obama's new gun laws and executive power and says, first of all, he's black and as a black person, being the president of the united states, well, that's something they still cannot get over. why does this keep coming up in washington? >> well, the interesting thing is, one of the most famous gun cases of the last few years is the mcdonald case in chicago. and it's an african-american gentleman defending himself and wanting to have a gun to defend himself, and the government of chicago trying to prevent that from happening. and the supreme court said, the second amendment does apply to cities, that even cities like chicago cannot on their own overturn the second amendment, but this was in defense of an african-american man who wanted to own a gun to defend himself and his family. so, i don't think there's anything racist about this. clarence thomas, an african-american, one of our most famous justices, also has written in many of the early cases where whitelaw is trying to take away guns from blacks and i
that polarization? >> you know what, lyndon johnson opened up the war on immigration in appalachia. most poor people are white, female and young, and black and brown hunger hurts. 50 million, these people are malnourished, homeless or wandering. they're unbankable, therefore they're driven into expensive loan arrangements. they are poor. they cannot send their children to school. they cannot dream. 50 million more very close to them, this impact of growing poverty and racial polarization and violence is a hell of a combination, and i would think that now we must in substance take a hard look at poverty. and some plan for economic reconstruction. look at places like inglewood, the president organized, london or austin, 45% unemployment. 50% unemployment. must be some targeted jobs planning and, of course, it's cheaper to educate than incarcerate. >> i remember most poignant memories about election night was a picture of you with tears streaming down your cheeks there in grand park, and i'm wondering if you have the same sort of combination of joy and hope that that expressed to me about the next four
, and there are two chapters on this. the johnson administration used the fairness doctrine to target some political enemies, one of the people i interviewed in year in addition to a number of us, mark fowler, the reagan chairman who helped dismantle the fairness doctrine. once you have that regulation of the way it allowed people like rush limbaugh to get a foothold in. that led to a real explosion of conservative, unleash. >> that was going to be my follow-up question. from 1920 to today, the predominant voices, was there a pattern? left right left? >> interesting enough, one of the things i write about in this book is out during the new deal you have a major metropolitan daily to the right.
of the united states. >> vice president lyndon b. johnson and the grief-stricken widow with them, takes the presidential oath aboard the jet, which brings him together with the body of the late president, back to washington. >> the flag flies at half-staff. president truman asks the full roosevelt cabinet remain in office. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. ♪ oh! progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever you
lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i do not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to. mcdonough is seen as an obama true believer who
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